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Welcome to the website of the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy

Instituted in 1992, the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy is an interdepartmental program of doctoral study at the University of Toronto, jointly administered by the Department of Philosophy, the Centre for Medieval Studies, and the Department of Classics. A student in the Collaborative Program is registered in one of these academic units, but may draw upon the resources of any unit. The University of Toronto has a long tradition of excellence in the study of ancient and medieval philosophy, and the Program trains students to carry on the tradition.

Latest News

  • Welcoming our new CPAMP students!
  • Let's welcome our new CPAMP students: in the philosophy department, Mark Hallap and Pia Morar; in classics, Jacob Dvorak and Ksenia Romashova; and in medieval studies, Rui Xu.
  • CPAMP congratulates recent graduate, Doug Campbell!
  • On August 13, 2020, Doug Campbell successfully defended his dissertation Circles and Rivets: Cosmology and Teleology in Plato's Theory of the Soul. He was examined by Professors Rachel Barney, James Allen, Lloyd Gerson, George Boys-Stones, and Gábor Betegh (Cambridge).   He is now a post-doctoral fellow in the Department of Philosophy here at U of T!
  • CPAMP welcomes new postdoc Máté Veres
  • As the 2020 academic year begins, CPAMP is pleased to welcome new postdoctoral fellow Máté Veres. Máté works mainly on Hellenistic philosophy, with a focus on epistemology and ethics. Prior to coming to Toronto, he held research and teaching fellowships at the University of Hamburg, at the University of Geneva, and at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. During his studies, he was a Fulbright scholar at Cornell University and a visiting student at the Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge. His recent publications include ‘Sextus Empiricus on Religious Dogmatism’, Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 58 (2020), ‘Keep Calm and Carry On: Sextus Empiricus on the Origins of Pyrrhonism’, History of Philosophy and Logical Analysis 23 (2020), and ‘Theology, Innatism, and the Epicurean Self’, Ancient Philosophy 37 (2017). More information about his work may be found on his website and on his Academia.edu page.