Events 2014-15

by Rachel Barney .

Events 2014-2015

Tuesday, September 16
John Dillon (Trinity College Dublin): “The Origins of Platonist Dogmatism”; JHB 100, 3-5pm (This event will be followed by a beginning-of-the-year reception)
 
Friday/Saturday, September 19/20
Thursday, September 25
Jessica Moss (NYU): “Dual Systems in 400 BC: Plato’s Parts of the Soul and Contemporary Psychology”; JHB 100, 3-5pm (This talk is part of the Department of Philosophy’s Colloquium Series)
Thursday, October 9
Alexander Long (University of St. Andrews): “Achieved and Guaranteed Immortality in Plato”; JHB 418, 3-5pm
  
Saturday/Sunday, March 7/8
Sarah Broadie (University of St. Andrews): “Plato and Aristotle on the Theoretical Impulse”; JHB 418, 3-5pm
Wednesday, April 8
Jean de Groot (Catholic University of America): “The Trouble with Weight: Mechanics up to Archimedes”; room 212, Victoria College, 12-1:30pm (This is the annual IHPST-CPAMP Lecture on Ancient and Medieval Science, co-organized by CPAMP and the Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology.)

UTCMP 2015

by Rachel Barney .

The University of Toronto Colloquium in Mediaeval Philosophy 2015

Friday, September 25

Session I (4:30 – 6:30)


Chair: Matthew K. Siebert (University of Toronto)

Speaker: Marilyn McCord Adams (Rutgers University): “John Duns Scotus vs Henry of Ghent on Divine Illumination: Muddying the Waters”

Commentary: Giorgio Pini (Fordham University)

 

Saturday, September 26

 

Session II (10:00 – 12:00)

Chair: Walid Saleh (University of Toronto)

Speaker: Emma Gannagé (Georgetown University): “Al-Kindî On Why Mathematics Matters”

Commentary: Thérèse-Anne Druart (Catholic University of America)

 

Session III (2:00 – 4:00)

Chair: Celia Byrne (University of Toronto)

Zita Thot (Fordham University): “Was Giles a Thomist about Divine Concurrence?”

René Létourneau (Université du Québec, Montréal): “Substantial Plurality of the Soul: A Mid-XIIIth Century Naturalist Interpretation”

Michael Szlachta (University of Toronto): “Peter John Olivi, Freedom, and the Will’s Dominativus Aspectus

 

Session IV (4:15 – 6:15)

Chair: Bernardo Carlos Bazan (University of Ottawa)

Antoine Côté (University of Ottawa): “Pierre Roger (1291-1352) on the Causes and Object of Cognition”

Commentary: Peter John Hartman (Loyola University, Chicago)

All sessions will be held in Room 100 of the Jackman Humanities Building (170 St. George Street) and are free and open to the public.

Registration and inquiries: medieval_dot_philosophy_at_utoronto_dot_ca

The colloquium is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, the Centre for Medieval Studies, the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies, and the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

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Organizers: Deborah Black, Peter King, Martin Pickavé

Congratulations to Willie Costello

by Rachel Barney .

Willie Costello, a recent CPAMP graduate,  has been appointed a Mellon Postoctoral Fellow at Stanford University, a three-year position starting September 2015. Willie completed his PhD in the Philosophy Department in April, with his thesis “From causes to Forms: the Phaedo and the foundations of Platonic metaphysics”.

Congratulations to Willie Costello and Nathan Gilbert

by Rachel Barney .

Congratulations to Willie Costello and Nathan Gilbert on the successful defenses of their excellent dissertations this week. Well done Dr. Costello and Dr. Gilbert!! Willie Costello’s thesis is entitled “From Causes to Forms: the Phaedo and the Foundations of Platonic Metaphysics”. It was directed by Rachel Barney and the external examiner was Sarah Broadie (University of St. Andrews). Nathan Gilbert’s thesis “Among Friends: Cicero and the Epicureans” was supervised by Brad Inwood. Catherine Steel (University of Glasgow) took part in the defense as external examiner.

ATWAP 2015

by Rachel Barney .

THE ANCIENT SOPHISTS:
TEXTS, ARGUMENTS, METHODS, INFLUENCE

Seventh Annual Toronto Workshop in Ancient Philosophy 

March 7-8, 2015
Jackman Humanities Building 418

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Conference at Cambridge on Abelard’s Logic

by Rachel Barney .

UntitledPeter King and Christopher Martin (University of Auckland, NZ), who recently spent a year at the University of Toronto as PIMS/CMS Distinguished Visiting Scholar, are organizing a conference on the later logical writings of the 12th-century philosopher Peter Abelard, concentrating on the Logica nostrorum petitioni sociorum and the Glossae secundum vocales. The conference takes place at Trinity College, Cambridge, UK from February 13 to 16, 2015. The programme includes presentations by Peter King, Christopher Martin, John Marenbon, Onno Knepkens, Klaus Jacobi, Sten Ebbesen, Catarina Tarlazzi, and Riccardo Strobini. Funding for this conference has been provided by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Collaborative Programme in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy at the University of Toronto, Trinity College in Cambridge University, and a research grant from the University of Auckland.

Congratulations to Matthew and Michael Siebert!

by Rachel Barney .

Congratulations to Matthew and Michael Siebert! Both successfully defended their doctoral dissertations at the end of July. Matthew’s dissertation is entitled “Knowing and Trusting: the Medieval Social Epistemologies of Augustine and Aquinas”. Michael’s thesis is devoted to “Platonic Recollection and Illumination in Augustine’s Early Writings”. Well done! Matthew is now a postdoc at the University of Saint Louis.

UTCMP 2014

by Rachel Barney .

The University of Toronto Colloquium in Mediaeval Philosophy 2014

Friday, September 19

Session I (4:30 – 6:30)
Chair:  Claude Panaccio (Université du Québec, Montreal)
Speaker:  Blake Dutton (Loyola University Chicago): “Augustine on Knowledge of First Person Truths”
Commentator:  Susan Brower-Toland (Saint Louis University)

Saturday, September 20

Session II (10:00 – 12:00)
Chair:  Mohammed Rustom (Carleton University)
Speaker:  Olga Lizzini (VU University Amsterdam): “Potency, Power, and Potentiality in Avicenna: Some Remarks”
Commentator:  Robert Wisnovsky (McGill University)

Session III (2:00 – 4:00)
Chair:  Rachel Bauder (University of Toronto)
Geneviève Barrette (Université de Montréal): “On the esse/essentia Distinction: Could Hervaeus Natalis be a Thomist”
Garrett Smith (University of Notre Dame): “Petrus Thomae and the Problem of the plura aeterna”
Brian Embry (University of Toronto): “The Semi-Extrinsic Denomination View of Truth”

Session IV (4:15 – 6:15)
Chair:  Scott MacDonald (Cornell University)
Speaker:  Jeff Brower (Purdue University): “Aquinas on Prime Matter and Individuation”
Commentator:  Jorge Gracia (University of Buffalo)

All sessions will be held in Room 100 of the Jackman Humanities Building (170 St. George Street) and are free and open to the public.


Registration and inquiries: medieval_dot_philosophy_at_utoronto_dot_ca

The colloquium is sponsored by the Department of Philosophy, the Collaborative Program in Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, and the Centre for Medieval Studies, the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies, and the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.

Organizers: Deborah Black, Peter King, Martin Pickavé

CPAMP at the Second Canadian Colloquium for Ancient Philosophy

by Rachel Barney .

CPAMP is putting in a strong presence at the upcoming second Canadian Colloquium for Ancient Philosophy (University of British Columbia, May 2-4, 2014). Lloyd Gerson, Juan Pablo Bermúdez Rey, Nathan Gilbert are either presenting or commentating. Among the other speakers are CPAMP alumni Margaret Cameron and Monte Johnson. See here for a complete program of the event.

New Book: From Plato to Platonism

by Rachel Barney .

From PlatoCongratulations to Lloyd Gerson on the publication of his new book From Plato to Platonism. To quote from the publisher’s description: “Was Plato a Platonist? While ancient disciples of Plato would have answered this question in the affirmative, modern scholars have generally denied that Plato’s own philosophy was in substantial agreement with that of the Platonists of succeeding centuries. In From Plato to Platonism, Lloyd P. Gerson argues that the ancients were correct in their assessment. He arrives at this conclusion in an especially ingenious manner, challenging fundamental assumptions about how Plato’s teachings have come to be understood. Through deft readings of the philosophical principles found in Plato’s dialogues and in the Platonic tradition beginning with Aristotle, he shows that Platonism, broadly conceived, is the polar opposite of naturalism and that the history of philosophy from Plato until the seventeenth century was the history of various efforts to find the most consistent and complete version of ‘anti-naturalism’.”